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    Three-quarters of a century after the cries of “Gold! Gold! In the Klondike!” a quirky little airline with deep roots in the state of Alaska decided to pay its own tribute to the gold rush. Alaska Airlines’ “Golden Nugget Service” era launched in the early 1960s, and passengers would not soon forget it. Billboards invited customers to “jet the Gay 90s way,” in Boeing 727s decked out with wild wallpaper, decorative tassels... Read More

    ashkniggeAn Alaska Airlines ticket counter during the Golden Nugget era in the 1960s.A twin prop Grumman G-21A ashkniggeAn Alaska Airlines ticket counter during the Golden Nugget era in the 1960s.A twin prop Grumman G-21A "Goose" waits at the Ketchikan terminal dock in the late 1960s.First Class service during the Golden Nugget era.A billboard invites customers to "jet the Gay 90s way."Alaska Airlines president Charlie Willis plays the banjo for passengers.A flight attendant waves from the door of a Golden Nugget jet.Interior of a Golden Nugget jet.An Alaska Airlines Golden Nugget 727.

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    As much as he appreciates the Bombardier Q400’s sophisticated flight deck technology, Horizon Air Captain Rob Sandberg quite enjoys stepping back in time. He can often be found at the controls of World War II fighter aircraft, flying for a worthy cause close to his heart. For the past seven years, the Seattle-based pilot has been a member of the Condor Squadron, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit group that preserves and flies AT-6... Read More

    Rob Sandberg at the controls of a World War II-era AT-6.MikeRFormation flying.Sandberg with Jean McCreedy, a member of a World War II women's military pilot group that Sandberg's Condor Squadron honored in December 2013.Sandberg with McCreedy inside an AT-6, ready for takeoff.The Condor Squadron performs a flyover at the Los Angeles Angels' 2013 home opener.Rob Sandberg at the controls of a World War II-era AT-6.MikeRFormation flying.Sandberg with Jean McCreedy, a member of a World War II women's military pilot group that Sandberg's Condor Squadron honored in December 2013.Sandberg with McCreedy inside an AT-6, ready for takeoff.The Condor Squadron performs a flyover at the Los Angeles Angels' 2013 home opener.

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    This month, Alaska Airlines launched daily nonstop service between Seattle and Detroit. For on-the-ground advice about things to do in Detroit, we turned to resident expert Dan Austin, a journalist at the Detroit Free Press who also runs historicdetroit.org and has written two books about the city’s legendary architecture. “Detroit is a city that is on its way back, but its reputation isn’t doing it any favors,” Austin said. “Nine out of... Read More

    Detroit_DanasccosgroveThe Henry Forddowntown DetroitMotown MuseumDetroit RiverwalkDIA Detroit Institute of ArtsGreektown Detroit at nightDetroit_DanasccosgroveThe Henry Forddowntown DetroitMotown MuseumDetroit RiverwalkDIA Detroit Institute of ArtsGreektown Detroit at night

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    To five-year-olds in Kotzebue, Alaska (and Internet surfers round the world), the question of just whose face adorns the tails of Alaska Airlines 737s is a heated one. It is an oft-asked question about the Seattle-based airline, but the truth is anything but simple. “When I was a little kid, we all thought it was our own grandfathers,” says former Kotzebue mayor Maija Lukin. “We all thought it was our tata. Even if... Read More

    ashkniggeState-of-Alaska-Mapwho is on the tailThe Eskimo was first introduced in 1972 as one of a set of four liveries featuring iconic images from the state of Alaska. The earliest design featured a stern Eskimo and the word Alaska written in black block letters.AS TotemN797727 Spires TailSEATR 1970's logo727-100PushBackThe Eskimo was first introduced in 1972 as one of a set of four liveries featuring iconic images from the state of Alaska. The earliest design featured a stern Eskimo and the word Alaska written in black block letters.The other three designs were retired after several years, and the face on the tail was given a smile and applied to the rest of Alaska’s fleet.From the mid-1990s on, Alaska jets featured the airline's most recognizable livery, still flying on many of its jets today.In early 2015, a handful of Alaska jets were repainted with an interim refreshed design. The letters in the wordmark were smoothed out and the extended leg of the ashkniggeState-of-Alaska-Mapwho is on the tailThe Eskimo was first introduced in 1972 as one of a set of four liveries featuring iconic images from the state of Alaska. The earliest design featured a stern Eskimo and the word Alaska written in black block letters.AS TotemN797727 Spires TailSEATR 1970's logo727-100PushBackThe Eskimo was first introduced in 1972 as one of a set of four liveries featuring iconic images from the state of Alaska. The earliest design featured a stern Eskimo and the word Alaska written in black block letters.The other three designs were retired after several years, and the face on the tail was given a smile and applied to the rest of Alaska’s fleet.From the mid-1990s on, Alaska jets featured the airline's most recognizable livery, still flying on many of its jets today.In early 2015, a handful of Alaska jets were repainted with an interim refreshed design. The letters in the wordmark were smoothed out and the extended leg of the "K" in Alaska was lowered.In January 2016, Alaska Airlines revealed the most substantial updates to its brand in a quarter century, streamlining its wordmark and adding pops of color around its iconic Eskimo tail design.Oliver Amouak - Alaska Airlines Corporate ArchivesChester Seveck - Alaska Airlines Corporate Archives

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    Pausing from a TV commercial shoot back in the day is Director Joe Sedelmaier (front, center). Can you guess who was Alaska’s then-CEO in this photo? The unconventional Alaska Airlines TV ads from the 1980s and ’90s got a little fresh air at this year’s American Advertising Hall of Fame ceremony. The commercials were directed by legendary ad man Joe Sedelmaier, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in April –... Read More

    SedelmeierasmlindseySedelmeierasmlindsey

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    Irv Bertram (pictured above) has handled the paperwork for Alaska’s aircraft purchases for the past four decades. In the 50 years Alaska Airlines has been buying and flying Boeing planes, acquiring aircraft has never been easier. First, the airline has the cash to buy jets fresh off the assembly line in Renton. Second, Alaska is close to Boeing – both in proximity and in our longtime business relationship. The Seattle Delivery Center... Read More

    Irv Bertramasccosgrove1964-1965: Alaska’s then-CEO Charlie Willis, left, negotiates the airline’s first formal agreement with Boeing – originally for two 727-100s, later increased to three. The book “Character & Characters” tells how Willis originally signed the Boeing deal on the back of a lawyer’s shirt, because he couldn’t find any paper after some late-night negotiating.1966: Strike up the band! Alaska’s first Boeing, a 727 with the tail number N797AS, is delivered in October 1966. It's pictured here during its first visit to Sitka.1967: Willis, center, announces an order for one wide-body Boeing 747, but the deal is canceled a year later. If the expensive purchase had gone through, it's likely that Alaska Airlines would not be in business today.1978: At the time of the Airline Deregulation Act , Alaska’s entire fleet consists of 10 Boeing 727s serving only 11 cities –10 in the state of Alaska and only Seattle in the Lower 48.1978: At the time of the Airline Deregulation Act , Alaska’s entire fleet consists of 10 Boeing 727s serving only 11 cities –10 in the state of Alaska and only Seattle in the Lower 48.1981: Alaska acquires its first new Boeing 737 when it begins flying the 737-200 Combi. Considered by many to be ideal for service within the state of Alaska, the unique aircraft – known as “Mud Hens” because they could be operated on muddy gravel runways – features a movable partition so it could be quickly reconfigured to carry a combination of cargo or passengers. These aircraft became the workhorse of the fleet for intra-Alaska flying until 2007, when the last one was retired and donated to the Alaska Aviation Museum in Anchorage.1992: Alaska begins operating the 737-400, several of which are painted in special liveries. These include the Spirit of Disneyland (Mickey Mouse), Magic of Disneyland (Tinker Bell), Spirit of Make-AWish (Genie) and the Salmon-Thirty-Salmon.1992: Alaska begins operating the 737-400. Several of the -400s are painted in special liveries, such as the Spirit of Disneyland (Mickey Mouse), Magic of Disneyland (Tinker Bell), Spirit of Make-A-Wish (Genie) and the Salmon-Thirty-Salmon.1999: Alaska begins flying its first Next-Generation plane, the 737-700. The airline relies on the -700 to launch transcontinental service to the East Coast.2001: As the launch customer, Alaska Airlines accepts delivery of the world’s first Next Generation Boeing 737-900 aircraft. With the first three -900s delivered in May, Alaska’s total fleet count reached 100 aircraft for the first time in the company history.2005: Alaska welcomes the 737-800 to its family of jets. With lower cost per available seat mile than the -700, and longer range than the -900, it is well suited to longer haul markets. The ETOPS-certified -800 enables Alaska to begin service to Hawaii in 2007.2007: Alaska replaces its fleet of nine 737-200 Combis with five 737-400 Combis, pictured here, and one -400 Freighter.2008: Alaska transitions to an all-Boeing 737 fleet in August 2008 with the retirement of its last MD-80 (Alaska operated MD-80s for 23 years, starting in 1985, and had as many as 44 – about half its fleet at the time).2012: Alaska takes delivery of its first 737-900ER. The -900ER burns about the same amount of fuel as the -400, but has 25 percent more seats. Cabin enhancements include larger storage bins, the Boeing Sky Interior, Recaro seats, power outlets, and an overall better customer experience.2015: Alaska is the first airline to offer Boeing Space Bins. The larger bins will come standard on new deliveries of Next-Generation 737s.2016: Alaska will take delivery of 19 737-900ERs this year. The airline also has firm commitments for 57 737 aircraft with options to acquire up to 46 additional 737 aircraft.alaska-airlines-boeing-100-livery-at-paint-hangar2017: In late 2017, Alaska is expected to take delivery of its first Boeing 737 MAX, pictured here in an artist's rendering.Irv Bertramasccosgrove1964-1965: Alaska’s then-CEO Charlie Willis, left, negotiates the airline’s first formal agreement with Boeing – originally for two 727-100s, later increased to three. The book “Character & Characters” tells how Willis originally signed the Boeing deal on the back of a lawyer’s shirt, because he couldn’t find any paper after some late-night negotiating.1966: Strike up the band! Alaska’s first Boeing, a 727 with the tail number N797AS, is delivered in October 1966. It's pictured here during its first visit to Sitka.1967: Willis, center, announces an order for one wide-body Boeing 747, but the deal is canceled a year later. If the expensive purchase had gone through, it's likely that Alaska Airlines would not be in business today.1978: At the time of the Airline Deregulation Act , Alaska’s entire fleet consists of 10 Boeing 727s serving only 11 cities –10 in the state of Alaska and only Seattle in the Lower 48.1978: At the time of the Airline Deregulation Act , Alaska’s entire fleet consists of 10 Boeing 727s serving only 11 cities –10 in the state of Alaska and only Seattle in the Lower 48.1981: Alaska acquires its first new Boeing 737 when it begins flying the 737-200 Combi. Considered by many to be ideal for service within the state of Alaska, the unique aircraft – known as “Mud Hens” because they could be operated on muddy gravel runways – features a movable partition so it could be quickly reconfigured to carry a combination of cargo or passengers. These aircraft became the workhorse of the fleet for intra-Alaska flying until 2007, when the last one was retired and donated to the Alaska Aviation Museum in Anchorage.1992: Alaska begins operating the 737-400, several of which are painted in special liveries. These include the Spirit of Disneyland (Mickey Mouse), Magic of Disneyland (Tinker Bell), Spirit of Make-AWish (Genie) and the Salmon-Thirty-Salmon.1992: Alaska begins operating the 737-400. Several of the -400s are painted in special liveries, such as the Spirit of Disneyland (Mickey Mouse), Magic of Disneyland (Tinker Bell), Spirit of Make-A-Wish (Genie) and the Salmon-Thirty-Salmon.1999: Alaska begins flying its first Next-Generation plane, the 737-700. The airline relies on the -700 to launch transcontinental service to the East Coast.2001: As the launch customer, Alaska Airlines accepts delivery of the world’s first Next Generation Boeing 737-900 aircraft. With the first three -900s delivered in May, Alaska’s total fleet count reached 100 aircraft for the first time in the company history.2005: Alaska welcomes the 737-800 to its family of jets. With lower cost per available seat mile than the -700, and longer range than the -900, it is well suited to longer haul markets. The ETOPS-certified -800 enables Alaska to begin service to Hawaii in 2007.2007: Alaska replaces its fleet of nine 737-200 Combis with five 737-400 Combis, pictured here, and one -400 Freighter.2008: Alaska transitions to an all-Boeing 737 fleet in August 2008 with the retirement of its last MD-80 (Alaska operated MD-80s for 23 years, starting in 1985, and had as many as 44 – about half its fleet at the time).2012: Alaska takes delivery of its first 737-900ER. The -900ER burns about the same amount of fuel as the -400, but has 25 percent more seats. Cabin enhancements include larger storage bins, the Boeing Sky Interior, Recaro seats, power outlets, and an overall better customer experience.2015: Alaska is the first airline to offer Boeing Space Bins. The larger bins will come standard on new deliveries of Next-Generation 737s.2016: Alaska will take delivery of 19 737-900ERs this year. The airline also has firm commitments for 57 737 aircraft with options to acquire up to 46 additional 737 aircraft.alaska-airlines-boeing-100-livery-at-paint-hangar2017: In late 2017, Alaska is expected to take delivery of its first Boeing 737 MAX, pictured here in an artist's rendering.

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    This week, Horizon Air is celebrating the 35th anniversary of its inaugural flight on Sept. 1, 1981. Although Horizon Air and Alaska Airlines remain separately managed to this day, the two companies have been closely linked for nearly 30 years. Both are subsidiaries of Alaska Air Group, and all Horizon flights are marketed and sold by Alaska. Since 2011, Horizon’s Q400 aircraft have featured Alaska’s familiar livery with the Eskimo on the tail.... Read More

    Q400 in MammothMikeRPassengers board Horizon Air's first flight in 1981.Horizon Air founder Milt Kuolt80s flight crewOriginal employees of Horizon Air.pilotsbeer pouringteam at Ops CenterFA and pilotQ400 in MammothMikeRPassengers board Horizon Air's first flight in 1981.Horizon Air founder Milt Kuolt80s flight crewOriginal employees of Horizon Air.pilotsbeer pouringteam at Ops CenterFA and pilot

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    When Alaska Airlines began service to Havana on Jan. 5, it wasn’t the first time the airline had flown to Cuba. In the early 1970s, Alaska flew U.S. Military Airlift Command charter flights to the base at Guantanamo Bay, as well as charters to Caribbean locations such as Jamaica, Puerto Rico and Panama. Some of the flight attendants from that era still fly for Alaska Airlines today, including Julia Simmonds, Joanne De... Read More

    30_cuba_1000asccosgroveJoanne De Cicco, at left in a photo from the early 1970s, worked on the charter flights to Cuba. She's still an Alaska flight attendant today.joanne-decicco-todayalaska-airlines-cuba-flight-log-bookAlaska flew charters to Cuba on a Boeing 727.30_cuba_1000asccosgroveJoanne De Cicco, at left in a photo from the early 1970s, worked on the charter flights to Cuba. She's still an Alaska flight attendant today.joanne-decicco-todayalaska-airlines-cuba-flight-log-bookAlaska flew charters to Cuba on a Boeing 727.

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    Creating an airline people love is a bold goal, but if anyone is up for the challenge, it’s Alaska Airlines and Virgin America. Today, Virgin America was named the “Top Domestic Airline” 2017 in Travel + Leisure “World’s Best Awards” for the 10th year in a row. In May, Alaska Airlines ranked highest in airline customer satisfaction among traditional carriers for the 10th consecutive year in the J.D. Power 2017 North America Airline... Read More

    asnewsroomPhoto of woman passenger on Virgin America flight using inflight wi-fi on a tablet.Photo of man on Alaska Airlines jet using Free Chat serviceA photo of a male Swissport employee fueling an Alaska Airlines jet with biofuel.A photo of the homepage of the old alaskaair.com. Says asnewsroomPhoto of woman passenger on Virgin America flight using inflight wi-fi on a tablet.Photo of man on Alaska Airlines jet using Free Chat serviceA photo of a male Swissport employee fueling an Alaska Airlines jet with biofuel.A photo of the homepage of the old alaskaair.com. Says "Alaska's World" on the top left, with icons for Reservations, Schedules, Destination Information, Mileage Plan and Reference Desk.This is a photo of an Apple iPad sitting on an aircraft tray table using the AlaskaA photo of a tweet between @NerdyBBW saying "I won't lie I'm super nervous about flying. But as silly as it sounds tweeting with you guys is actually helping me" @AlaskaAir replies: "We are virtually here for you! Our fabulous crew & airport team will take great care of you as well! -Kimball"A photo of a male Alaska Airlines agent helping print bag tags at a Self-Tag station for a family of 4 traveling together.A photo of a customer throwing an Alaska coffee cup in a recycling bag held by an Alaska Airlines flight attendant onboard an Alaska Airlines aircraft.Photo of an Alaska Airlines MVP Gold 75K luggage tag on a black roller bag suitcase.

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    In 1949, the world was continuing to recover from the end of one of the most horrific wars in human history. After the horrors of the Holocaust, Jewish refugees scattered throughout the world were looking to start over in Israel, but the process was not easy. Not only did many groups face logistical challenges, but they also faced a great deal of violence. In addition to Europe, many lesser known Jewish communities... Read More

    ascgoettlerThis is a photo of a black sextant sitting on top of a worn wooden box.This is a close up photo of a silver Rolex watch on Elgen Long's left arm.This is a historical photo in black and white print of a group of about 50 Yemenite Jews awaiting transport on the streets of Aden.This is a historical, black and white photo of two young Yemenite Jews sitting on the tarmac with a DC-4 aircraft behind them.This is a historical, black and white photo of a group of about 15 Yemenite Jews gathering beside the entrance of an airplane.This is a photo of Elgen Long standing and rolling his left sleeve up to show the silver Rolex watch to a group of people.This is a photo of four men standing in front of a ascgoettlerThis is a photo of a black sextant sitting on top of a worn wooden box.This is a close up photo of a silver Rolex watch on Elgen Long's left arm.This is a historical photo in black and white print of a group of about 50 Yemenite Jews awaiting transport on the streets of Aden.This is a historical, black and white photo of two young Yemenite Jews sitting on the tarmac with a DC-4 aircraft behind them.This is a historical, black and white photo of a group of about 15 Yemenite Jews gathering beside the entrance of an airplane.This is a photo of Elgen Long standing and rolling his left sleeve up to show the silver Rolex watch to a group of people.This is a photo of four men standing in front of a "StandWithUs" backdrop. The two men on the left are holding awards.

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    Two aviation geeks met up last week to fly an old plane. That usually wouldn’t be noteworthy, except the pilots just happened to be Alaska Airlines CEO Brad Tilden and Hawaiian Airlines CEO Mark Dunkerley. And this exact aircraft – a 1929 Bellanca CH-300 Pacemaker, tail number NC251M – has historical ties to both airlines. Nearly 90 years ago, this was the first aircraft in Hawaiian’s fleet. A few years after that,... Read More

    BT_and_MDasccosgroveBT_and_MDasccosgrove